Didanosine

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[edit] BRAND NAMES

[edit] STRUCTURE

Didanosine.jpg

[edit] MECHANISM OF ACTION

Didanosine (ddI), an analog of adenosine, is an oral nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI). It's the second antiretroviral drug to be licensed, after AZT (Zidovudine)

Antiviral activity of Didanosine is dependent on intracellular conversion to the active triphosphorylated form. The rate of didanosine phosphorylation varies, depending on cell type.

Inhibition of reverse transcriptase interferes with the generation of DNA copies of viral RNA, a process termed reverse transcription, which, in turn, are necessary for synthesis of new virions.

Intracellular enzymes subsequently eliminate the HIV particle that previously had been uncoated, and left unprotected, during entry into the host cell. Thus, reverse transcriptase inhibitors are virustatic and do not eliminate HIV from the body.

Even though human DNA polymerase is less susceptible to the pharmacologic effects of triphosphorylated didanosine, this action may nevertheless account for some of the drug's toxicity.

[edit] INDICATIONS

Didanosine is used in combination with other antiretroviral agents for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection. It is given as part of a three-drug regimen that includes another NRTI (e.g., lamivudine, stavudine, zidovudine) and a Protease inhibitor or an NNRTI or an Integrase inhibitor when treating HIV infection.

[edit] DOSAGE

[edit] CONTRAINDICATIONS

[edit] PRECAUTIONS

[edit] INTERACTIONS

[edit] PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

[edit] SIDE EFFECTS

[edit] RELATED LINKS

[edit] BIBLIOGRAPHY

[edit] REFERENCES