Brimonidine (topical gel)

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[edit] BRAND NAMES

[edit] STRUCTURE

Brimonidine.jpg

[edit] MECHANISM OF ACTION

Brimonidine is an α2 adrenergic agonist. Topical application of Brimonidine topical gel may reduce erythema through direct vasoconstriction.

[edit] INDICATIONS

Topical treatment of persistent facial erythema of rosacea in adults 18 years of age or older (FDA)

[edit] DOSAGE

Apply a pea-size amount once daily to each of the five areas of the face (forehead, chin, nose, each cheek) avoiding the eyes and lips.

[edit] CONTRAINDICATIONS

None

[edit] PRECAUTIONS

  • Potentiation of Vascular Insufficiency: use with caution in patients with depression, cerebral or coronary insufficiency, Raynaud’s phenomenon, orthostatic hypotension, thrombangiitis obliterans, scleroderma, or Sjögren’s syndrome.
  • Severe Cardiovascular Disease: Brimonidine can lower blood pressure. Use with caution in patients with severe or unstable or uncontrolled cardiovascular disease
  • Erythema and Flushing: Some subjects in the clinical trials discontinued use of Brimonidine topical gel because of erythema or flushing. The effect of MIRVASO topical gel may begin to diminish hours after application. For some subjects in the clinical trials, erythema was reported to return worse compared to the severity at baseline

[edit] INTERACTIONS

  • Brimonidine may reduce blood pressure. Caution in using drugs such as beta-blockers, anti-hypertensives and/or cardiac glycosides is advised.

[edit] PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

  • Pregnancy Category B (US). Brimonidine topical gel should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus
  • Nursing Mothers: A decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

[edit] SIDE EFFECTS

The most common adverse reactions included erythema, flushing, skin burning sensation, and contact dermatitis.

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